Search Member Login Accessibility Options

Webinar – Disability Pride, Joy, and Visions for the Future

Date: Thursday, July 11, 2024
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 PM ET

In the face of systemic ableism and intersecting marginalization, many disabled people find pride in disability identity and culture. Within disability communities, disabled people can share creative solutions, offer mutual support, strategize advocacy approaches, and experience immense joy. Join us for a webinar featuring disabled panelists celebrating disability pride, and learn why philanthropy should fund disabled-led, joy-centered spaces.

CART will be provided. If you require another accommodation to fully participate in the webinar, please note it in your registration, or contact us at communications@disabilityphilanthropy.org. This free webinar is presented by the Disability & Philanthropy Forum.

Afro-Latina woman with caramel colored skin smiling at the camera, she is wearing light blue denim shirt, a tan wide brimmed hat and multicolored earrings with a black power fist.

Panelist: Jen White-Johnson, Disabled Artist, Activist, Designer, and Educator

Jen White-Johnson (she/they) is a distinguished Afro-Latina artist, activist, designer, and educator, whose creative expressions delve into the intersection of content and caregiving. With a profound focus on reshaping ableist visual culture, Jen, an artist-educator grappling with Graves disease and ADHD, brings a heart-centered and electric approach to disability advocacy. Her invaluable contributions to these movements manifest through powerful and dynamic art and media that simultaneously educate, bridge divergent worlds, and envision a future reflective of her Autistic son’s experiences. Jen’s activism extends to collaborations with notable brands and art spaces, including Coachella, Target, and Adobe, both in print and digital realms. Her photography and design work have gained recognition in esteemed publications such as Art in America, Juxtapoz Magazine, AfroPunk, and she has contributed insightful essays to publications like “After Universal Design: The Disability Design Revolution” and “An Anthology of Blackness.” Notably, Jen’s work is permanently archived at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National African American Museum of History and Culture in DC. Holding an MFA in Graphic Design from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Jen resides in Baltimore, MD, with her husband and 11-year-old son.